Beyond

I have a poetry quest to 200 going at present, if you wish to follow its progress.

June

A Thousand Healing Haiku

Illumination
through curtains of devotion
opening her spiritual eyes

Her eyes look
beyond roses and thorns
their focus is the desire for dawn

Dawn understands prayers embrace
illumines inner being
With Amazing Grace

(c)  Words and Image, June Perkins

No. 10 -12 in the Journey to 200

Joe Paczkowski

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Story Boat

My haiku blog has been very quiet.  But I have decided to compose and share 200 Haiku for the bicentennial year – it’s my gift to Baha’u’llah. I will try for around 19 syllables where possible,  link them as I go and think about the significance of this year.  Wish me luck!

A Thousand Healing Haiku

This boat has a story
it carries humanity’s dreams
in future unseen

(c) June Perkins, Word and Image

Gift – 200 Haiku for the Bicentennial, aiming for a 19 syllable structure though.

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10 Things about Poetry and Me: Andrea Gallagher

1.      What is your earliest memory of poetry?

My earliest memory of poetry was having a teacher introduce my class to Spike Milligan’s work in children’s books. He seemed incredibly fun.

 2.       When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?

 I have worked as a professional writer for more than 15 years in the corporate world and while this is a great career, I wasn’t finding it massively inspiring. I loved writing poetry and creative writing in all forms when I was young, but I went over to the very serious side of writing to make my living after school and that took a lot of fun out of it for quite a while.

So in 2013, I just started writing rhymes as a hobby to get my creative juices flowing after my very serious work days, and then the ideas for my two children’s books, Superstar Grandmas, and, Mega-rad Grand-dads, just took over.

3.       Do you think writing for children is the same or different as writing for adults (explain)?

 I think it is absolutely different. I think that writing for every new audience is different if you are doing it with care. If you want to write for the enjoyment, understanding, or action of any audience you need to step into their shoes and write for them, with them specifically in mind – and I believe this is especially important when your audience are children. I like to get down low and think about the world as if I were still 7 years old. I’ll sometimes go back to places I lived back then to try to recapture those feelings and thoughts and then try to write for the little book-loving girl I once was (who still lives inside of the adult me).

4.       If you could be any poet in history who would you choose to be and why?

T.S Elliot, not because I hope to emulate the style, but simply because I read this poetry when I was a teenager and the thought of this work makes me feel connected to that time in my life.

5.       What are five words to describe your poetry?

 Vibrant, punchy, symmetrical, rhyming, childish.

6.       Share a few lines from one of the poems you have written that you are most proud of?

I wrote my first published poem when I was 11 and, although it’s simple and childish, it helped me tell the world what my very unusual experience of life was like (I was going through a battle with cancer and writing was a great outlet for a lot of confusion and grief). It makes me cringe a little but I’m still proud that I found any sort of positive way to express what was going on for me at such a dramatic time:

Wish so hard upon a star,

wish that you weren’t who you are.

Cry all night without a tear

to know the end may soon be near.

Hurt so bad it doesn’t show,

dream, but never let them grow.

Write, but never touch the paper,

not quite now but maybe later.

Think of days that may not come,

the coldest feelings leave me numb.

Carry on and value life,

but sickness cuts deep like a knife.

7.       What is your favourite form of poetry?

I like to write simple and very structured pieces that use rhyme, however I love to read long, meandering prose that uses strong visual elements to tell heartfelt stories. I hope to write like that when I grow up.   

8.       Have any of your poems been illustrated? If so what did you think of the illustration?

Yes – I love the bright and vibrant illustration of Superstar Grandmas and Mega-rad Grandads (created by artist, David Clare) because I think it matches the energy of the characters created with the four-line rhyme I used throughout.

 9.        Where is your best spot for writing poetry and why?

On planes – no real idea why that is but I do a lot of creative writing when I’m on planes. It may be about the movement between my regular life and going somewhere else.  I also wake up with poetic ideas some mornings – words coming out of dreams and sleep!

10.   What advice do you have for other poets wanting to write for children?

Be childish – remember what it is to feel like a child.

Want to know more about Andrea, head to these links.

www.andreagallagher.com.au

www.facebook.com/superstargrandmas

www.facebook.com/megaradgrandads

Read a Kids Book review of her latest book HERE

Launching Mega-Rad Granddads!

 

After a bit of a wait, the Mega-rad Grandads’ book is almost here and (following the fun of the Superstar Grandmas book launch in December).

 

Mega-rad Grandads Community Book Launch

Sunday, 2-4pm, 23 April 2017

Grange Bowls Club

79 Sellheim St

Grange QLD 4051

Dave Clare’s art will be on display, and there will be  games to play outside that everyone in the family can enjoy together.

RSVP to andrea@penelopeandpeter.com

 

Interviewed by June Perkins

(part of an ongoing series on children’s poets)

Mind of Forests

I love to keep my hand in with writing, especially when in the midst of publishing work for Magic Fish Dreaming.

I’ve been looking at the prompts at Tweetspeak and having a go at them. There are plenty of wonderful poetry prompt sites, and I really enjoy working with some of the tools others have developed as well as developing my own.

Ripple Poetry

One must have a mind of forests
branches creaking with the wind
a song of long forgotten ones
that fell

to be covered by shades of green, rich and velvet
tasted by the eyes
cupped in bowl like hands then
eaten for future dreams.

Light sneaks in from the sky
to streak across the
pathway below
through the gaps of green
lines of warmth
awakening the green.

I look to the leaves
dancing velvet
praise to the sky.

(c) June Perkins

Working with some prompts from Tweetspeak Poetry

Prompt one ‘One must have a mind of’ and sensory language.

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Poetry Prompt #18

Australian Children's Poetry

Poetry Prompt 17

Are you feeling creative? Are the words already chasing each other around in your head? I hope so because I can’t wait to see what you come up with in response to this one. It’s always a thrill to read the submissions to the weekly Poetry Prompt, so thank you for taking part in this creative exercise and please keep them coming. Don’t forget, if you’ve missed a prompt, you can catch up any time. Send your poems to traffa-m@bigpond.net.au as a Word document attachment and add a personal note about why or how you chose to write this particular poem.

Happy writing!

Teena

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