Bullimba Imaginings

If you go to Bullimba

you will walk past some interesting pieces of street art.

Perhaps they will make you think of a story or poem.

Who is this lady? Where is she going?

You will see some interesting signs if you look up.

They might suggest to you a story,

an idea for an album cover or a song about Frankie and the Fox.

And then there might be some unusual things, like

shops trying to attract you with kites and balloons.

You might ask yourself

Will this sign take off in the wind?

Will children be happy when their parents stop for coffee?

If you take the time to study this street scape  you will find

much to inspire!


Who are these two friends?  Are they celebrating something important?

And then look at a bus reminding all of the Anzacs.

Brisbane remembers its Anzacs!

And maybe the street art will make you feel like

you are travelling back in time?

This journey today was all so

I could leave some Magic Fish Dreaming books at Riverbend Books,

but on the way I found much inspiration and made a photo essay

about a Magic street.

Ten Things About Poetry and Me: J.R.Poulter/J.R.McRae

Another in the series Ten Things About Poetry and Me.
Enjoy!

Ripple Poetry

1.What is  your earliest memory of poetry?

I’m told, I knew all my nursery rhymes by heart before I went to Kindergarten. So someone, possibly my mother or maternal grandmother, taught me. My love of verse came from listening, firstly, to my father recite comic verses by Lewis Carroll and melodramatic poetry by Mrs Felicia Hemans [Casablanca, in particular, which he recited with flair] and, secondly, to my maternal grandfather recite The Man from Snowy River, and reading The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll.

2.When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?

I started writing poetry and illustrating my verse whilst in primary. Many of the poems were either narrative or humorous or both, which I read or wrote to my maternal grandmother, who is responsible for having encouraged this behaviour in her granddaughter..

3.Do you think writing for children is the…

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The Fix- it-Man

ISBN  9781925335347   Hardcover Picture Book   EK Books Endorsed by Paradise Kids

It is a challenge to cover the deeper topics in life for young children in a way that is relatable, honest and caring, but Dimity Powell’s The Fix -it-Man sets out to do just that.   Nicky Johnston’s gentle, joyful and equally caring illustrations take the reader through the happy, although sometimes challenging times, in a family that is about to be broken by something that just can’t be fixed.  A double centre spread of predominantly subdued grey father and daughter nestled in a bean bag, is particularly moving, and marks a shift in the narrative from the fix-it- man to a fix- it- girl.  Another especially powerful metaphor for grief in the story is the broken teddy bear, ‘Tiger’ who needs mending.  Our young narrator says, ‘Pieces spill out from Tiger’s heart, as Dad takes him from my hand. ‘I can’t fix him Dad.’ The idea that in the healing process at different times all family members can play a role, and need to care for those still living, is especially powerful.

I can see the book often being used by early childhood educators, psychologists and hospitals as a tool to trigger discussion of how children and parents can find ways to recover from loss, especially how father and daughters can assist each other. But at the same time children will enjoy the journey of a courageous and vivacious little girl who sometimes breaks things precisely because she is so vibrant, and who is lucky to have a kind- hearted Dad who is her hero.  Well done Nicky and Dimity for a simply beautiful contribution to children’s picture books and EK publishing for publishing it.

Book available from all good bookstores.

Dimity will be signing books

Berkelouw Books on the Sunshine Coast, April 22nd, 2017

Meet the Sandcliffe Festival Presenters: Veny Armanno

Venero (Veny) Armanno was born in Brisbane to Sicilian migrant parents. He is the author of two books of short stories and nine critically acclaimed novels.

In the 1993 Jumping at the Moon was equal runner-up, Steele Rudd Award for Best Short Story collection. My Beautiful Friend was runner-up Aurealis Best Horror Novel, 1996. Firehead was shortlisted for the Queensland Premier’s Literary Award for Best Novel in 1999 and The Volcano won that award in 2002. The Volcano was also shortlisted for the Courier Mail Best Book of the Year. Veny’s last novel Black Mountain (2012) received wide critical acclaim.

In 2016 he published his second collection of short stories, Travel Under Any Star, and in September this year his latest book Burning Down will be released.

His novels have been published in USA, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Holland, Israel and South Korea.

Veny is also a trained screenwriter and teaches creative writing at University of Queensland.


1. Have you been to the Sandcliffe Festival Before?

No, this is my first time.

2. What are you looking forward to and how did you become involved in it this year?

I’m looking forward to seeing what it’s all about and meeting readers and book lovers. It’s always good to (eventually) get away from the desk and actually see and hear what people think about literature in the real world.

3. What is the main focus of what you will be speaking about at the festival (a short sneak peek)

We’re talking about issues of belonging and migration, I think – things I seem to have been writing about for decades. A lot of the discussion will depend on where the questions and conversations take us, but I’m sure Melissa will speak about indigineity, and I’ll be able to speak about European migration to Australia and the establishment of new homes and lives. We’re looking at this through the idea of being (or not being) an outsider.

4. If you could choose to be a favourite literary character, who would you be and why?

Is Batman a literary character? I’d love to be a do-gooder, but not in tights etc. Maybe James Bond, that’d be cool. Except I’m Italian so it doesn’t seem quite right. If I really had to pick, it would be someone like Cesar Castilo from The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love – a Cuban-American migrant who comes to America with big dreams. He is/was a great (fictional) musician, lover, drinker…

To find out more about Veny Armanno

Author Site:
Facebook:
Amazon:


First Sandcliffe event. ‘Insights of an Outsider’

Sunday 23rd April,

11am – 12pm

Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St. Brisbane

Panel Session: Featuring Melissa Lucashenko, Veny Armanno and Lauren Daniels

Organised by Society of Women Writers QLD and funded by Lord Mayor’s Writers in Residence program.

Free entry, but library would appreciate bookings so they have some idea of numbers. Please ph: library on 3403 4166.

Dymocks Books will be there selling author’s works

For more information on the festival visit FACEBOOK

In Eumundi with Magic Fish Dreaming

Trip to Eumundi.

Magic Fish Dreaming

Thanks Eumundi for your great reception to Magic Fish Dreaming.

On Saturday the 15th of April  I visited Berkelouw books, the  Sunshine Coast to sign copies of Magic Fish Dreaming.

It was a super busy market day, and there were so many  wonderful stalls.  I heard about these from my daughter and husband who went for a walk around the market after they were finally able to find a park.  They saw bird whistles,  art, special healing skin creams and lots of psychics. But even with so much to choose from Magic Fish Dreaming was not overlooked by wayfarers in the market.

Berkelouw books who stock the book suggested that being stationed out the front of the shop to catch the passing foot traffic would be a great idea.  And it was!  Thanks to staff for having me at the shop.

I forgot to ask someone to a…

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