Helene Safajou

Some of the work to be featured at Illumine this weekend.

Be Illumined

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Helene Safajou was born in Ethiopia and raised both in East Africa and France, Helene followed her husband to Australia in 1995 after many years living as a nomad.

After a life in the corporate and teaching world, and seeking relief from postnatal depression, her life as an artist started in 1998.

She does not have any formal training in art. Everything she has learnt has been through self guided learning, weekend workshops and informal online courses, with a large dose of trial and error! In 2009, she studied Graphic Design at Kingscliff TAFE.

She loves using oils, acrylics, inks, collage and hand stitching in her work, which gives her the opportunity to express her family and spiritual heritage.

For her, art is a spiritual practice to connect with the past and the present and most of all a tool for meditation and healing.

Helene is participating in Illumine, Byron…

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Illumine – Art and Performance Ruha Fifita

One of the artists featured in Illumine.

Be Illumined

Art Work by Ruha Fifita

Ruha Fifita

Ruha Fifita was born in Vava’u, Tonga, in 1990 and has spent most of her life with her family in Vava’u, Ha’apai, and Tongatapu. In 2006 she co-founded ON THE SPOT (OTS), an arts organisation aimed at exploring and utilising the arts as a tool for community building. She sees Tongan culture as a living entity and hopes her artwork inspires young people to take ownership of it. Ruha has a degree in Creative Industries from the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane. She is currently Pacific Arts Research Assistant for the GOMA and is extensively involved in community building in the Goodna and scenic rim area.

Interviews with Ruha
 
SBS interview with Ruha Fifita and Robin White

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Mystery of Visual Literacy – Leigh Hobbs Laureate at Large

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Leigh Hobbs, this year’s Australian Children’s Laureate, is about to give a lecture, The Mystery of Visual Literacy, to the three quarters full auditorium in the state library, Queensland. The talk has been sponsored by Book Links and the Queensland Writer’s Centre. Scanning the audience I see many of my Writelinks buddies,  visitors from the Gold Coast and further afield, prominent children’s  literature advocates, and several librarians.

[Also check out Sam Sochacka Article on the Lecture at the awesome BookLinks Blog]

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Images Courtesy: Sam Sochacka , June Perkins (aka Gumbootspearlz), Jillanne Harrison, Giuseppi Poli, Leigh Hobbs & Sally (surname unknown)

Mr Hobbs is the creator of Old Tom as well as Mr Chicken and the  4F For Freaks. I used to giggle watching the television version of Old Tom when my children were growing up, as it seemed to have a lot of jokes highly suitable for parents, not just their offspring.

He seems to have a spring in his step and twinkle in his eye before he even begins and smiles as he offers to sign posters, featuring some of his characters, that he has bought with him.  Many of us line up and take him up on this offer.

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Then Megan Daley, who doesn’t want to say anything about herself but is a great advocate for children’s literature, gives him a warm introduction, and talks about the good old days and various children’s book creatives she hung out with, and Book Links and the dream for a children’s literature centre in Brisbane. Everyone in the audience claps keen support for that idea.

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Mr Hobbs begins by telling us that he feels ‘a responsibility and protectiveness to his audience, children.’

He tells us he will make the talk as much about us as him, he will share several pictures as they say a lot more than words can ‘a picture is worth a thousand words,’ and will be teaching us to draw Old Tom.

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He tells us that theory is not his thing, but he will speak to us from his experience as a secondary teacher,  a visiting presenter to several countries and his memories of his own childhood.  (He shows us a few pictures of these presentations later, with photographs that show the children all having a go at drawing old Tom).

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He explains that he writes in an ‘adult’ voice, not as a child. But he likes to have fun and celebrate the ‘absurd.’  He shows that absurdity throughout the presentation with images.

He tells us that his creations are character studies and that he works ‘innately and never writes or draws down to children.’  He doesn’t feel a need to be ‘realistic with his art’ and he totally believes children will relish the opportunity to stretch their minds.

He works with three levels: first the words,  second images and  thirdly the contradiction between the words and image.  Often the image is doing something every different from the words.  Interpretation doesn’t have to be literal.

He likes to work instinctively and intuitively.  He tells us a funny story about when a student asked him to explain, ‘Why is Old Tom is sometimes very big and sometimes tiny and doesn’t seem to be drawn to scale?’  He asked if anyone in the audience if they knew the answer and another kid explained, ‘that is because Old Tom is big when he is good, proud, happy and small when he is bad or in trouble.’  That is visual literacy!

His character’s size then depends on their emotion.

Hobbs, explains that if children like characters, and they’re well constructed, they will be gripped by them in a couple of pages and make a decision whether to keep going into their world.   He doesn’t write with ‘a message’, but rather with ‘real’ characters, experiencing loss, friendship and more .

Some of his books appear ‘subversive to adults,’ but children just relate to them as they innately understand characters like Horrible Harriet,  the  outcast. Not to mention that naughty Old Tom.

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Hobbs has had a mixed experience with critics, but it is the children who are the most inspiring in their responses to his work and there was one editor very early on who believed in his work and gave him the opportunity to share it.

He reads us a scathing critique from a prominent Australian newspaper where the writer/reader didn’t display any understanding of the characters in his text, and compares it to  comments from some positive kid fans  (six and five) in Ireland wrote, including their teacher (30 years old).  They asked delightful questions which he savours reading to the audience.  He then reads us another adult critic who did understand his book, and loved it. He is philosophical about this and not at all bitter.  He talks about the process of how people enter the world of books like his.

At this point Hobbs shows us a picture of himself as a child in bed, reading, with an alarm clock behind him.  There are a few aws in the audience.  He tells us his parents wouldn’t allow him to draw until it was at least 6am as he drew all of the time.  So he would wait for the alarm to go off  and then draw.

As a boy he wanted to grow up to be an artist and travel to London.  His favourite books were non-fiction books about castles, architecture, and London. He liked to inhabit the worlds in these books.  He does point out the Noddy Collection in the back of the photograph (I remember my brother having this set too.) He has been to London over 30 times and that’s why one character, Mr Chicken goes to London. Mr Badger is also created out of his passion for England.

Today he likes to travel everywhere with his notebook and sketch.

He shows us some slides of teapots with architectural construction and other visuals of things that inspire his art. He always loved architecture and history. He then tells us a bit more of the history of where Old Tom came from (he is maybe a bit based on him and his mum is the mum in the book) and reads us some of the pages of the book as they appear projected up on a screen behind him.

He talks to us about some of the other books, like  4 F for Freaks, and shows us some pictures.  He jokes, but is deadly serious as well, that many of these characters are based on kids he knows.  Well they are kids we all know if we think about it. Some of the teachers in the audience are giggling now, showing their visual literacy.

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He says, ‘kids are scary, ‘the audience laugh.  ‘Yes, I don’t like to read aloud to them as they might not laugh in the right places, and then I might stop being intuitive when I create.’  Instead he prefers to teach them to draw and field questions about the characters, which he will sometimes have them answer themselves.  Sneaky Mr Hobbs, but maybe there is something in this technique, because it is about not talking down to children!  Children can explain his characters and how they are represented to EACH OTHER.

He explains that children read Old Tom and see that the cat is like a baby, a naughty boy, and the mother, a control freak.  Angela is lonely which is why the cat is her baby boy. The cat/boy wants to grow up, and is sometimes immature and pretends to be sleeping to avoid things like helping the mother.

He once wanted to dedicate one of the Old Tom books to his mum, but she said, ‘no’ which at the time made him grumpy.  He loved his mum but used to fight with her a lot (I think I might have giggled here, sorry mum).  When he spoke to another relative about this, they just laughed and said, ‘Mum always complained those books were all about her and you.’

At the start of every old Tom book Mr Hobbs doesn’t assume anyone knows Tom, and so he introduces him.

His pictures are never just literal and he will for instance have a vacuum cleaner with eyes (this flashes up on the screen.)  They have an emotional honesty to them.

Then Hobbs, tells us more about Horrible Harriet and Mr Chicken and shares slides of portions from each book.  He shows Mr Chicken sitting on a chair visiting the Queen, and sitting daintily and the Queen is depicted respectfully.

Mr Chicken is pretty mischievous and bold too and he shows us some of his adventures in Rome as well. More laughter from the adult audience gathered.

Mr Chicken is in some ways ‘an affront to the adult world,’ but he makes total sense to children (and the children at heart?)

Every now and then he has a comedic break, and shows us things like Mr Chicken now on the loose in Queensland.  Could a new book be on the way?

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‘Children like Mr Chicken because he is bold and funny. ‘ Mr Hobbs invites us to have pictures with Mr Chicken later and holds up a toy of him.

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And now it is lesson time.  We all learn to draw Old Tom. How to make him angry looking, and mischievous. It’s fun!  Mr Hobbs tells us all our pictures will be different and he asks some people to voluntarily show their pictures once we are done.  These are projected up for all of us to see.

He makes a few jokes about how the pictures reflect the personality of the ‘feral’ artists, which makes a few people look at their pictures a bit more and giggle.  One will later proudly sign hers and share it on her facebook!

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Then it is question time.

And in his response to the questions he shares his feeling that libraries are safe havens for many of the kids who feel like freaks at school.  They one space they are not assessed in within the school environment, but are FREE to read, write and draw.

He thinks schools spend way too much time assessing!  More cheers from the audience.

He tells us a story about one of the freaks of the library days of his school days being someone who grew up to become a famous journalist.  The library was his safe place.

He shares that if someone wants to grow up to be a laureate, they should first just be a writer or artist.  To foster this you can give those someones  notebooks and say ‘draw whatever you wish, observe the world around you  and you don’t have to show your book to me unless you want to.’ This gives children freedom.

Mr Hobbs very much believes that everyone has the right to make marks on paper, and be free, which is why he taught us how to draw Mr Tom, but some of those who do this will grow up to be artists.

He likes to think of himself as an artist, not an illustrator, but he does tell stories in art.

There are a few more questions and we find out that his dear old Mum is gone, but she got to live to see her son doing something he loved.

Now we head off for a VIP reception and Mr Hobbs kindly deals with a long line of people asking for photographs and autographs in his books (some of them have dashed down stairs to grab some from the shop.)  None of them are children but there are several illustrators amongst them.  Mr Chicken meets Mr Grumbles!  Another character on paper. A big of magic happens.  Giuseppe and Yvonne are delighted.

Every now and then he dashes out of the autograph line to grab a snack and talk to someone he knows and then he heads back to his Laureate duties.

He has a bit of a joke with everyone, and is smiling, and some of us make sure all the food trays are pushed towards him so he doesn’t suffer autograph fatigue.  Who would know so many adults would start acting like Old Tom and Mr Chicken? Grown ups can be cheeky!

Mr Chicken makes an appearance in the centre of the group photograph, that we manage to call people together for – all wearing their VIP stickers.  Everyone seems to be in high spirits and several have the giggles.

Someone makes sure that Mr Hobbs finally gets to eat more food.  In fact maybe they are turning him into Old Tom or is it Mr Chicken.

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Mr Hobbs leapt across the stage  at the end of his talk to become Mr Chicken.

Reception Time

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Mr Grumbles introduced to Mr Chicken!

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“I had a brilliant evening @ Book Links 2nd annual lecture in childrens literature with guest speaker Australian Children’s Laureate, Leigh Hobbs. I was impressed with the delightful manner in which Leigh Hobbs shared his knowledge and experience. During his presentation ‘The Mystery of Visual Literacy’ with a projector at hand, he got everyone to follow his direction to create our own drawing of ‘Old Tom’ a main character in one of his picture books. He explained that he writes and draws instinctively, saying ‘he doesn’t draw down to the children, he makes them stretch up to the understanding of the image”

Jillanne Harrison

“Creating amazing children’s literature is a whole lot of craft and good splash of magic. After listening to Leigh Hobbs – Australian Children’s Laureate, I have levelled up in craft …and experienced a little bit of magic. Can’t wait to share this with the school kids. Awesome – Go Australian Children’s Literature!”

Giuseppe Poli

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You can check out Mr Hobbs in action tomorrow and he was busy there today as well :

As part of the Out of the Box festival the 2016/17 Australian Children’s Laureate Leigh Hobbs is coming to the State Library of Queensland to introduce us to a trove of his Picture Book characters: Mr. Badger, Old Tom, Horrible Harriet, Fiona the Pig and the well-travelled Mr. Chicken.

Leigh will be conducting Create a Character illustration workshops to show you how to create your own colourful characters ready for their own adventures.

When: 25th and 26th June 2016 – three sessions per day at 10am, 12pm and 2pm

Where: Auditorium 2, Level 2, State Library of Queensland

Cost: Free but bookings required.

For more information please phone 07 3840 7927 or email Lyps@slq.qld.gov.au.

For more on helping a Children’s Centre for Literature happen check out BookLinks

For more resources Children’s Calendar PDF   This Month Hear a Story; Feel a Story

Check out Sam Sochacka’s Article on the Lecture.

Images Courtesy: Sam  Sochacka , June Perkins (aka Gumbootspearlz), Jillanne Harrison, Giuseppi Poli, Leigh Hobbs & Sally (surname unknown)

 

Geranium Lake

This one for Vincent.

World Citizen Dreaming

Orquideas, pajaros y flores . Medellin - 2009 Medellin – Flickr Creative Commons

For Vincent Van Gough

I am a lover
Without love.

My church takes away
My Priesthood.

I am a Vicar
Whose church is
Esoine red,
Geranium lake.

I am a painter
Who half sees
Empty chairs
Geranium lakes,
Black crows.

I am Beethoven’s
Right hand man.

Curated light cancers
My cherry trees.

Our orchards bear white apples.

I am my painted
Yellow sunflowers.

I am a
Painted love geranium
Tormented
Esoine red.

By June Perkins

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Discovering Youth Art

Last night a Youth Arts Exhibition opened at Mission Beach community Arts Centre.

These are just a few photographic highlights.

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Hayley, Sonya and Sheridan
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Young Singers – Buskers doing a gig
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Ben
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Some of the crowd

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A wonderful night was had by the over 50 people who attended.
 
As well as supporting young local artists, the evening gave families of the artists a chance to mingle and meet others from throughout the Cassowary Coast. Visitors from from as far as Townsville came to support the artists and the night, and artists and their families came from Feluga, Mission Beach, Murray Upper and Tully.
 
The biggest eye capturing piece was a street art sign saying Mission Beach Arts Rocks. This, along with some individual pieces displayed beside it, were made possible through money provided by the Cassowary Coastal council for a street arts workshop. This had a tropical twist to it, through featuring butterflies around the letters.
 
It did present a challenge to hang, but thankfully this was resolved, and at the conclusion of the exhibition will grace the outside of the gallery to add colour and youthful vitality.
 
Hayley Gillespie’s workshop resulted in a Discovering Me wall, full of vibrant pieces of portraits, butterflies, ying and yang and a colourful still life.  Hayley came to the opening and selected pieces for encouragement awards.  She commented on how much she enjoyed working with the young artists from the area.
 
Another school holidays workshop with Sally Moroney led to the inclusion of a wire sculpture of a giraffe made by Matilda, a six year old artist, who recently moved from Victoria to the area with her family.  Sally holds regular workshops for budding artists of the area and encourages them with their work.  She held a preliminary meeting to encourage their participation in the project.  They then put the word out to their friends as well.
 
A few students from Tully High school put in work, with Sonya, Caitlin and Sheridan all receiving encouragement awards.  Sonya, Judge’s Choice, Caitlin, composition, and wall display, Sheridan.  Each high school artist featured a dragon in her art and all are good friends.
 
Sonya had striking social commentary in some of her pieces, and a note about how she had obtained bones from animals to construct one.  Caitlin created delightful bird paintings on feathers amongst her three contributions. Sheridan’s mixed media wall had several digital art pieces, as well as a collage and some canvas work.

 

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Sonja

 
Other award winners where Shinji for his use of colour, and Georgia for her open and moving artists’ statements.  Vouchers for further art supplies were a welcome reward to the emerging artists.

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Matilda and her creation

 
There are many other noteworthy art pieces including an almost murder mystery trio of pieces.  You’ll need to go have a look at the exhibition to see what they were.  It is open until the 23rd of July.
 

Young musicians came and shared their instrumental and singing talents whilst attendees feasted on cheese, crackers and a sausage sizzle.  Sally made a discovery a young group of buskers who she invited along to participate in the night.
 
Ben, an up and coming guitarist, gave his guitar a brilliant and sustained workout; playing, blues, popular and classical to set a beautiful tone for the afternoon/evening.
 
Sonya gave a heartfelt thank you to Sally for all she does for local artists when arising to accept her award.  Many  parents also thanked her for providing this opportunity for young people from the area.  Hayley Gillespie was thanked for inspiring them as well, and some of the children and youth requested photographs with her.

 

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Young Artist and Hayley

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Chris and daughter, and Sally