The Night Before Yasi

4 years ago today. (February 2nd in Australia)

From the blog archives.

The rain and wind are picking up. You can hear a slightly increasing wind.

It quietens and then gusts again.

The guinea pigs are asleep dear ones.

Youngest is watching cricket with his Dad as the power is still on.

We have listened to Anna Bligh’s speeches and inarticulate teary people at evacuation centres.

‘Sit tight,’they say – ‘sit tight, it’s the water surges not the winds that kill people.’

David has put a mattress up again the window in our safe room. Peep flies around every now and then.

We are working on our digital story to keep us occupied.

We keep charging the batteries.

The sky is grey- the guinea pigs are waking and a bit on edge, and their caring owners see to them.

There are tiny breeze in the house due to the tiny holes in the floor and spaces here and there under doors I think.

We play games to occupy us.

We wonder where and when the eye will come. I think of that awful book by Patrick White I had to study at uni, Eye of the Storm. That was like being in a storm to read that work. I never want to read it again.

I think about the fact my daughter smiles when she is nervous, and Peep is running around and sitting on everyone’s shoulders.

The kids are actually a bit sleepy- they haven’t had much sleep – youngest is grumpy, but a wicket saves the day and is given something else to focus on. The wind gusts have swelled down again….it is raining.

We decided on consultation with others our house was safest to stay in – strong roof etc all set up and proofed, but if our neigbours have problems they will come here, or if we do we will go there, it makes you feel more secure.

(c) June Perkins

After Yasi 4 year Anniversary – nearly here

February 2nd in Australia.

It’s been  weekend of reviews and this morning a profound chat with Ali.

Tomorrow it will be 4 years since Cyclone Yasi made landfall.  Presently Tropical Cyclone Ola looks like it won’t be too much hassle.  One of our sources of information during Yasi, other than the BOM site and ABC, were Oz Cyclone Chasers.  I still check their site to see how things are brewing in the Far North.

There is just one more blog hop  for the After Yasi Virtual Book tour, and then a wrap up post and launch.

The final blog we’ll visit is of profound and compassionate musician, Melinda Irvine, who is herself now working in Aftermath recovery in the Phillipines.

Over the weekend Carol Campbell,  Gail Kavanagh and Owen Allen posted reviews of the ebook.

“The eBook is an interactive experience that links to blogs and sources that show how people coped with the cyclone and the aftermath. It’s a rich trail of material that celebrates the human spirit in all its facets – despair, pain, recovery, optimism and resilience.blghopchristine

Among the highlights for me are Christine Jenkins and the anchor she tied to her house; Mr Hardy and his chainsaw optimism; and the wonderful poem Cassowaries Can Fly.”
Gail Kavanagh

GailKavanagh

“Having an interest in contemporary dance, I particularly appreciated that one of the recovery events that June documented was a dance workshop run by local dancer Danielle Wilson. Contemporary dance is still a less well-developed community art form in Australia.” Owen Allen

Owen

This morning Ali Stegert has shared her interview focusing on yasi and its impact on children and youth,  with thought provoking questions inspired by her background as a school counsellor.

ali

Don’t forget that if you leave a comment on any of our blogs included in the virtual tour you will have a chance to win a free copy of the ebook or copy of the photographic print from the book.  Your chance to comment for a prize continues until the 6th of February.