PiBoIdMo Hooray

Hooray – made it with 30 ideas.   This time thinking a lot about environment, non-fiction, funny sayings,  fractured fairy tales with a twist,  and weird mixes of ideas – and ideas for cultural books.

Also some ideas for more poetry books.

Congratulations to everyone else who made it too, or even got close.  Just think now you have enough ideas to keep you inspired and follow through on for quite a while!  Which reminds me to look in last year’s notebook and see what gems are still there to be polished.

 

12311317_10154587213538538_2616851898394887547_n

PiBoIdMo Day 1: Joan Holub Gets Fresh (plus a prize!)

Some really great ideas here. I especially liked the smashing two ideas together. Thanks Joan.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

4 Joan Holub SIBA 2015 castle hat The Knights Before Christmasby Joan Holub

Yay, you guys, for taking part in PiBoIdMo 2015! Below are 3 things that work for me in my writing, and I hope you’ll find something in here that works for you.

1. Need a fresh way of inspiring new book ideas? Start with a title:

  • This is what R.L. Stine often does according to his interview with NPR. And about one third of my 130+ books began with a title (Goddess Girls series co-authored with Suzanne Williams; Zero the Hero).
  • Sources for titles you could tweak, mix-and-match, or reshape to inspire your next story include TV Guide, movie titles, book titles, idioms, fairy tales, folk tales, and nursery rhymes. Keep a list of intriguing, catchy phrases you dream up or overhear. Think: What could a book with this title be about?
  • Joan says to self: Little Red Writing. What could a book with this…

View original post 603 more words

Pre-PiBoIdMo Day 3: Tune In with Diana Murray (plus prizes!)

I just loved this post. I think making space to notice the inspiration all around us as we walk and live or view art or nature is so precious. What a beautiful tote bag. Thanks so much Dianne for sharing. Ha! I had to laugh at the messy part. I’m like that a lot when in the midst of creative projects like exhibitions, and creating things like rewards for kickstarters.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

inspirationTV-Murrayby Diana Murray

Inspiration is everywhere. It’s just a matter of tuning into it. And in order to do that, you need to switch on that part of your brain that reminds you to evaluate funny or interesting or poignant experiences and ask, “Could this be inspiration for a book?” If you don’t stop to notice it, inspiration can pass you by. Of course it’s also helpful to record things right away so you won’t forget. Official PiBoIdMo journal anyone?

Here are a few ways you can tune into inspiration:

1. Look to Yourself

GrimeldaCoverSm

When I wrote GRIMELDA: THE VERY MESSY WITCH, I started with the character trait of being messy.

Unfortunately, that’s a trait I am intimately familiar with, so I know how frustrating it can be. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve walked around the house wearing one flip-flop, desperately trying to find the other…

View original post 724 more words

Thinking Toes and Twinkling Readers

Girl Writing
Peagreenchick – Flickr Creative commons- vintage pics

Once upon a time my children and I played you-say-a-line-I-say-a-line, stories.  It was amusing, imaginative and kept us all on our thinking toes, although my daughter had a habit of killing lots of our characters until we had created on that she liked.

But years have passed and we haven’t played the I say-a-line-you-say a-line game for ages!

A couple of days ago I shared a story idea with my daughter and she became excited.   She was delighted with a creature and character I had invented and, being an artist, was immediately keen to draw them both in action.

She so loved the idea of my first two characters (a good sign I trust) that she enthusiastically began to look up names for them and several future characters and take notes!

‘They have to mean something Mum and then we can try different languages,’ and she popped along to some online translator which had audio of how the names would sound.

‘Do you like this name?’ Many words were clicked on, and the computer voice sometimes with a charming accent read them for us, and then we’d vote.

Now a writer of ego might have said –‘this is my story’  but she represents my potential readers and so she is very important to listen to.

Can’t tell you too much detail of our conversations, at this stage they are top secret!

Before I knew it my youngest son heard us laughing, haggling over the characters and generally having fun like the old days, and popped in to see what was going on.

Soon, at his insistence, he was involved and mapping the world.   There were mountains, forests, and more.  My children had become  engaged readers keen to take ownership of a creative world in the making.

The story I shared with them had become a collaboration.   Our past had become our present but now as my sage daughter noted ‘we are more sophisticated now.’

I created a world, and they began to help me fill it out, and paint it.  I felt a connection to two of my readers, or should I say co-storytellers.

I am ready to embark on the journey of this story and take two co-creating travelers with me, although as group leader, they do give me final word on things, after a bit of to and fro.

Not to mention I can work on it when they are at school, in some peace, until they have their next input.

Untitled
Stephane O – Flickr creative commons