My Progress in PiBoIdMo

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I see this emu whenever I walk to work. He is looking weathered and split at the moment. Wonder if he will last. June


It’s the perfect time to be doing PiBoIdMo for me.   Why?  

No more tutoring for the year, family still at school, a quiet house during the day, my kickstarter that can’t quite start yet (few tasks but nearly there).  Finally the space to write.

So where are the ideas brewing.

This year is inspired by research.

When I have an idea I see if it has been done before, and if not, I  begin to brainstorm it. If it has been done  I see if I can put a new twist on it, and then persist with it. If not I put it in the ‘don’t bother with it pile.’

I might be inspired by some of the blogs over at Tara’s blog and see whether their ideas help me make it an even better idea.

I’ve been reading a lot of Pasifika mythology, while thinking about a lot of the world endangered creatures and creatures that might not be endangered but who I would like to know more facts about. Who knows maybe I’ll combine these ideas, but how – that will be a surprise.

I’ve been taking note of funny stories my family tell and stories from Mum that I must ask her more about, but which I have a vague recollection from as a child.  Perhaps in these conversations a story idea might be born.

Now if I am sick of my computer, I think a walk might inspire an idea, so definitely heading out for one of those.  The picture at the header of this post is an emu carved by a chainsaw.  Hmm maybe there is an idea in that.

In Australia we have just reached day 5.

Good luck everyone with the rest of your PiBoIdMo. May you find even just one wonderful gem of idea that you feel passionate about dedicating some time to developing and polishing.

Over and out,  June aka Pearlz.

PiBoIdMo Day 3: When Grace Lin’s Picture Book Idea Isn’t a Picture Book (plus a prize!)

I love that your picture book ideas sometimes cross over into other books – I have a few that is happening with too. It’s all a matter of going with the flow. Thanks for sharing your journey Grace.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

GraceLin_photoby Grace Lin

I laughed a little when Tara asked me if I’d like to guest blog for PiBoIdMo. My last picture book was published over five years ago, around the time we were all trying to figure out if the report of the death of the picture book was greatly exaggerated. One might wonder that about my picture book career.

However, in the last five years, I have published two novels and three early readers (with a fourth coming out TODAY!). And when I thought about it, I realized that PiBoIdMo is about picture book ideas. And I realized every single one of my books has begun as a picture book idea.

For example, my first Ling and Ting early reader, was once a picture book dummy originally titled Ling, Ting and Ming (sorry, Ming, you got axed). In my youth, I had loved the Flicka…

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PiBoIdMo Day 2: Josh Funk Dares You to Do Your Worst (plus prizes!)

Hilarious – break all the rules – think of the worst thing you could write. Now that could be fun! Thanks for this fun post, and what lovely swag sets.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

Josh Funk Head Shotby Josh Funk

I know it’s only Day 2, but I want you to get all your BAD ideas out today. I want you to think of THE WORST idea you can.

Right now.

What would NOT make a good children’s book?

Maybe it has a horrible lesson.

It could be something completely unappealing to kids.

Or perhaps something adults will hate to read over and over and over again.

Make sure to think of something seriously flawed.

Okay. Have you got one?

Now let’s find a way to make it work—cause it’s bound to be unique and amazing.

A baby with a mustache? That’s absurd. Who would publish that?
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Clarion. That’s who.

A vegetarian vampire? Not a chance!
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Or maybe…

A canine with intestinal problems? Potty humor is just for adult novelty books …
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… and children with a sense of humor!

In fact, a book about a paranoid…

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Pre-PiBoIdMo Day 3: Tune In with Diana Murray (plus prizes!)

I just loved this post. I think making space to notice the inspiration all around us as we walk and live or view art or nature is so precious. What a beautiful tote bag. Thanks so much Dianne for sharing. Ha! I had to laugh at the messy part. I’m like that a lot when in the midst of creative projects like exhibitions, and creating things like rewards for kickstarters.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

inspirationTV-Murrayby Diana Murray

Inspiration is everywhere. It’s just a matter of tuning into it. And in order to do that, you need to switch on that part of your brain that reminds you to evaluate funny or interesting or poignant experiences and ask, “Could this be inspiration for a book?” If you don’t stop to notice it, inspiration can pass you by. Of course it’s also helpful to record things right away so you won’t forget. Official PiBoIdMo journal anyone?

Here are a few ways you can tune into inspiration:

1. Look to Yourself

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When I wrote GRIMELDA: THE VERY MESSY WITCH, I started with the character trait of being messy.

Unfortunately, that’s a trait I am intimately familiar with, so I know how frustrating it can be. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve walked around the house wearing one flip-flop, desperately trying to find the other…

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The Life and Songs of Shirley Lynn – Part 1

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At Song Trails – Taken by June Perkins

It’s a cold Brisbane morning when I phone Shirley Lynn, a singer-songwriter, based in the much warmer Cairns. I first met Lynn at Song Trails, a weekend song writing workshop, Tully, in 2012 and was impressed by her constructive and enthusiastic communication and the original compositions she shared.

Since then Lynn has been having some great musical achievements which include: releasing an EP called “It’s About Time”, winning a competition to promote the Port Douglas Carnivale with her original song, “My Kind of Paradise, in 2012, producing a video of this with a RADF grant and most recently releasing an EP of songs with her duo, Silktones, titled “Liberty.” Lynn’s journey to these achievements is an interesting and inspiring one.

With a warm coffee at my side we begin by tracing how Lynn first began her musical journey.

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I wrote my first songs as a teenager sitting in my bedroom in the Atherton Tablelands. Early songs were sometimes about saying things that were difficult to express in other ways. Since then the lyrics of my songs have always been important to me but my recollection of specific songs written as a teenager is vague.

My first instrument was the piano, both my grandmother and mother played piano. I had lessons and did a certificate three in music but by high school I wasn’t into ragtime and the type of music they were teaching me anymore. I took up the guitar and then continued to teach myself.

I was lucky at the beginning because many opportunities to share my music just found me. I played a lot around the Atherton Tablelands at local venues: pubs, hotels, restaurants. My parents were very supportive. Initially I had borrowed a friend’s PA system to perform then before too long, Mum took me to Cairns where I purchased my own gear.

Lynn had a positive beginning with her music at the same time she worked as a teacher.

Whilst I was a teacher I didn’t do as much writing but continued to play the guitar and perform locally.

Some of the things I did as a primary school teacher when teaching writing and creativity to children, like brain storming, drafting and reshaping, I apply to my own song writing process. After a trip overseas in the mid-eighties I began to write songs again. I wrote a song and played it at my sister’s wedding.

I did take an interest in the recording process when my husband and I spent time working in in the Torres Strait (he was principal of the school on Yam Island) and we had a four track Tascam recorder.

We regularly produced a radio segment called “Chit Chat” for the community radio which was broadcast every Friday. The show was produced for the purposes of the children’s language development, and always included music and songs from the students. We sent it to Thursday Island where it was then broadcast throughout the Strait. At that time I did experiment with some song ideas and still have remnants of those recordings somewhere, one I specifically remember was called “Mango and Malibu”.

When my two sons were born, I concentrated on singing them lullabies and nursery rhymes and my desire to perform and create music otherwise went by the wayside.

About eight years ago  Lynn quit teaching and was attracted back to making music more central to her life again. Although initially she didn’t head straight back into music, instead completing some IT training specialising in technology and website construction, she worked from home initially then for the TAFE and the Indigenous Lead Centre as a project officer and an instructional designer completing various projects over her 7 years there.

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Shirley with Songwriting group at Song Trails

 

However, something was still missing. This led to Lynn resigning from her TAFE job and seeking a new pathway through an old and long standing love in life – music. Lynn shares that her husband has been incredibly supportive through her whole process of discovering an authenticity about herself through her music.

In the last few years music has become the pivot in Lynn’s life; she cannot let a day go by without picking up her guitar and working on songs and her craft of song writing. The words and music tend to come into existence together as she creates her songs with guitar and notebook in hand:

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At Mondos – photo supplied

I began my journey back into music doing open mics. I had notebooks of songs and would work on them until they were ready to share publicly, and then test them out at places like Songwriters on the Waterfront. This is held at Mondos, and run by Terry Doyle. Terry has done a lot to support the promotion of original music and he has launched 25 albums from local artists in Cairns.

This open outdoor mic event features all original songs (no covers). It is a magic and relaxed location where people dine and listen to music. It happens regularly, unless it rains.

Lynn characterises her songs as ‘lyrical and rhythmic in their style,’ and is keen to not be put in a genre pigeonhole as she continues to want to experiment and explore.

I don’t like to be put in a box, but now when I contact radio stations and enter more song writing competitions the genre question is frequently asked, so I find myself having to reflect on it with a need to consider how to best categorise them.

On the Liberty CD the sleeve cover describes the work as swing blues, country pop, and folk. As I listen to her music again and some of it for the first time, each of her songs seems to have different combinations of these genres making for interesting fusions (I will do some album reviews in future blogs).

Lynn’s return to music has been accompanied by an intense thirst for learning the craft of song writing, which was part of the reason she was at Song Trails 2011-2012:

I am open to learning, and enjoy going to music camps to engage and learn things from being with other people; afterwards aiming to consolidate the skills picked up and begin to incorporate learning that inspires me into my own practice.

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CD Cover Image – Supplied

Lynn stresses how her song writing process is ‘evolving’ and changing as she learns from various activities she has engaged in including: workshops, online research, books she reads, collaboration with others and recording:

Lynn found inspiration from Kristina Olsen who has tutored at Music on Magnetic camps that Shirley has attended three times.

Kristina provided so many song writing tips, I still go back to her website to draw on her expertise and remind myself of things that she taught.

More recently, I have completed an online course developed by Pat Pattison and I am in the process of reading a couple of his books. I find the knowledge that he reveals very helpful too particularly when he is talking about stable and unstable structures.

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Blue Tonic with Jim McCabe

Lynn, who performs solo, duo – Silktones, and in a band Blue Tonic has found collaborating with others both challenging and inspiring.

It helps to be open to suggestions and ideas because you can come up with things that might not have occurred when working solo. Sometimes it can also be challenging when different tangents collide – collaboration can hit a wall without some flexibility from those in the process.

..…TO BE CONTINUED in the next installment we discuss how Shirley gained her confidence in performance, how Silktones was formed, the inspiration for some her songs,  and more!