PiBoIdMo Hooray

Hooray – made it with 30 ideas.   This time thinking a lot about environment, non-fiction, funny sayings,  fractured fairy tales with a twist,  and weird mixes of ideas – and ideas for cultural books.

Also some ideas for more poetry books.

Congratulations to everyone else who made it too, or even got close.  Just think now you have enough ideas to keep you inspired and follow through on for quite a while!  Which reminds me to look in last year’s notebook and see what gems are still there to be polished.

 

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PiBoIdMo Day 28: Paula Yoo Explores Non-Fiction Biographies (plus a prize!)

So true about research inspired books – I really love this advice and am now just finding a few more ideas more in the non fiction genre. Thank you.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

PaulaYoo2 copyby Paula Yoo

It’s Day 28 of Tara Lazar’s annual Picture Book Idea Month (AKA PiBoIdMo)! Two more days and you’re done. Best of all, you will have 30 ideas to explore for your next picture book draft… and hopefully, one day, a published book!

For today’s blog, I will walk you through the general process of how I write my non-fiction picture book biographies. Here we go…

1. How do I come up with a non-fiction picture book idea? I do the following:

  • KEEP CURRENT: Read books. Pay attention to the news (social media, TV news, newspapers/magazines).
  • BRAINSTORM: Brainstorm about your own personal life: hobbies, favorite music/TV/books/etc. You never know what ideas might spark!
  • FRIENDS: You never know—a friend might mention something that could spark an idea. For example, I have had friends mention an article they read that would inspire me to jot down a picture book idea…

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PiBoIdMo Day 20: Carolyn Fisher Switches Hats (plus a prize!)

Love reading the posts at PiBoIdMo,although I stopped a little this month to start writing a YA Novel and am now just catching up with the posts. Thought I’d share this one over at my blog as it is so interesting.  Have one PiBoIdMo idea I am really excited about and have been working on that as well.  I stop and take photographs or go for a walk when I can’t write, and yes I love to doodle drawings as well, but don’t consider myself an artist.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

by Carolyn Fisher

switcheshats

As you can see from the above, making a book is simple. I NEVER get stuck, beat-up or depressed!

But if I DID happen to get off track, I would switch hats. Draw for a while instead of writing. Write for a while instead of drawing. Change locations from my studio to a coffeeshop.

Just in case you’re having an off day, I have 3.5 suggestions:

1. Keep a sketchbook or notebook stuffed with people, places, or things.
Just for fun, pick a page at random to use as a story starter. Or pick two pages.

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2. Use thumbnail sketches
Draw quick, small sketches to generate ideas when you’re brainstorming. Test variations of your ideas. Ask: what if?

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3.0 Throw away your eraser.
The eraser makes you uptight. You don’t need the negative energy emanating from its pink pearly heart.

3.5 Draw or write in drafts.
Often…

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PiBoIdMo Day 11: Joe McGee Lives in a Child’s World (plus a prize!)

Hahaha! Give me that passport back to childhood now!

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

joe mcgeeby Joe McGee

Inspiration…that’s what we’re here to discuss, isn’t it?

To bandy around, to kick back and forth like a dented Campbell’s soup can on a weed-choked school blacktop. You know, the kind of blacktop where a hundred little sneakers will soon be racing around, attached to skinny ankles, attached to band-aide slathered kneecaps, attached to Star Wars t-shirt wearing torsos, attached to toothless grins on eager faces.

You there…yes, you. The adult standing over by the bleachers. Can you—there, that’s better. No shirts tucked in. Can we smear some dirt on your knees? Maybe leave a little cheese doodle smear on your cheek? Let’s put a few candy wrappers, a rock, and a marble or two in your pocket. Good, now we can talk. I mean, after all, we’re talking about writing for kids, right?

How can we write for kids if our adult selves get in the…

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PiBoIdMo Day 10: Janna Matthies Gets Tough (plus a prize!)

I absolutely love how you describe your approach to tough topics. Excellent advice. Thanks Janna.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

by Janna Matthies

As a guest blogger during this high-gear month of generating Pi Bo ideas, I’m honored to share in the charge to Inspire! My first word of inspiration is this:

My new picture book, TWO IS ENOUGH (adorably illustrated by Tuesday Mourning), releases today! YIPPEE!!

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While this might seem like shameless self-promotion (let’s face it, it is), it is also a reminder that people who only a few years ago were not published can one day accomplish that goal. Furthermore, we published authors—after only 4 books or, I hear, even after 25—are still dreaming, churning out ideas, putting bad ones through the shredder, writing, revising, submitting and hoping for the next book. The dream is attainable, and the process is ongoing for us all. We’re in this together!

My second word of inspiration is where I’ll land for today’s post. And it’s good news in a world where…

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