Haystack

This appeared on Australian Children’s Poetry blog today, and is also up at the Queensland Art Gallery.

Ripple Poetry

Image: William Delafield Cook A haystack 1982, Courtesy of the Queensland Art Gallery

Look! Rats and the children run out from
their hiding places in the haystack to
dance in front of us in a merry line?
Who else do you think hides here?

Do you have a memory of haystacks or
artist’s haystacks?

(Perceval’s Angel)

Tumble down the Haystack
dreaming columns of Greece.

Tumble down the Haystack
​             with childhood farming friends.

​Tumble down the Haystack
​             to horses and the cows.

Now,
climb up that artist’s Haystack
and tumble down again.

June Perkins (Brisbane-based poet and children’s author)​

***

June cover page-4 John Perceval Sculpture: The Herald Angel 1958 Ray Crooke, Woman with Blossoms

Dr June Perkins, a Brisbane based poet and children’s author, has developed an interactive journey, through the Australian Collection, through poems and micro-stories for visitors of all ages, with…

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The Diviner

Thinking of all those going through drought.

Ripple Poetry

Margaret Barr’s “Strange Children” [ballet], 1955 / photographer unknown  

 
With her forked stick
she walks the surface of the drought.
 

She walks the future of their farms
calling water to sing through the twig
wherever it may be.

 
She looks for The Dog stars
in the sky
waiting patiently at the twin’s table.

Cosmic dogs with dry throats sing,
‘the land will once again
have need of boats.’

 
She throws her forked stick
into the expanse of sky, whispers
‘Little Dog and Dog star hunt for water
Give us rain.’

 
But for now she must find the underground stores
to tide them over until that rain is found.

The Great Dog rises before dawn
at the end of summer.

 
Now hunting
of the rains can end.

 All will feast on her tears

soaking into earth
giving seeds birth to saplings
and a land…

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Poet at Play 4: Writing inspired by Art

Ripple Poetry

QAGOMA/ Sonja Carmichael

At the moment I am working on something special: writing inspired by art for QAGOMA. Later on this year my writing will go in display in the gallery alongside the art works.

The process so far has included exploring the art in the Australian Collection of the gallery and absorbing the atmosphere the art is displayed in and finding out the parameters of the project from the Engagement staff.

I am hoping to use some of my writing for children background in the works, and considering the way a narrative might weave stories out of the art works as well as employing poetic techniques in my response work.

As part of this journey I have been researching the works, their artists, and  the intentions and materials of the artists.  This is easy to do via the captions with the work, and the website of the QAGOMA which…

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Mermaids and Monster Trucks

I wrote this poem when I was working as a teacher aide, and the class sang it as a song.

Ripple Poetry

 

Monster Truck Boys, Monster Truck Boys
they love to drive their Monster trucks.

Mermaid Girls, Mermaid Girls
swimming with the dolphins
go the Mermaid Girls.

Mermaid Girls and Monster Truck Boys
Now they go to school
Could there be a duel?

Mermaid Girls watch the Monster Truck Boys.
Monster Truck Boys watch the Mermaid Girls.

Mermaid Girls, Mermaid Girls
super diving Mermaid Girls.

Monster Truck Boys, Monster Truck Boys
super driving monster trucks.

Mermaid Girls and Monster Truck Boys
They’re playing at magic school
which has a friendly rule.

Mermaid Girls can play with Monster Truck Boys.
Monster Truck Boys can play with Mermaid Girls.

Mermaid Girls talk to Monster Truck Boys.
Monster Truck Boys talk to Mermaid Girls.

Soon Monster Truck Boys
like swimming in the sea.
They’re jumping and bumping
in the sea.

Now Mermaid Girls
like driving monster trucks
as if they’re giant seals.

Mermaid Girls…

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Lullabies and cradle songs

Ripple Poetry

Writing a Lullaby

I am thinking about cradle songs and their origins.
I am thinking of their patterns and intent.
I am planning a poem about a refugee mother singing a lullaby.
That lullaby is full of love and hope.
That lullaby comforts them both.
I am imagining where she sings that song.
I am seeing her when she knows that hope is gone.
I am seeing her pick herself up and keep on dreaming on.
Will you join me and listen to her song?
Will you put yourself into her journey?
Will you welcome her to your shores?
Will you add your own verse?

(c) Image and words

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