Ten Things About Poetry and Me: Virginia Lowe

Another in the Ten Things About Poetry and Me Series 😉

Ripple Poetry

In 2016 Virginia was awarded the Leila St John Award for services to children’s literature in Victoria. Here she is with the medal.

1. What is your earliest memory of poetry?

My mother was a pianist. She was always at the piano, and I could sing 80 nursery rhymes when I was two (so my baby book says). Then there were the Zoe McHenry songs as well. All of these are rhymes, of course, so my first introduction to poetry was via song. The piano was a player piano, and we had rolls of most of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas as well. As soon as I could read, I could sing these too – and loved them.

I think we also had to  AA MilneWhen We were Very Young and Now We are Six, as I vaguely remember ‘Jonathan Jo had a mouth like an O’, ‘Christopher…

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Sunshine

hand
(c) June Perkins

Swaddle me in sunshine

sang the fairy child.

Weave me into forest,

tell me you have smiled.

Dance me tales of blossoms.

Look carefully for my signs.

 

Swaddle me in sunshine,

Now climb the magic vines.

Breathe me into spring time.

Search for the unseen.

 

Swaddle me in sunshine.

Cover trees in green

Swaddle me in sunshine,

when winter’s on her way.

Find for me some shelter

to keep the cold at bay.

June Perkins

 

First published at Australian Children’s Poetry, May 16th 2017

Using the prompt Sunshine, Prompt 15, 2017

Ten Things About Poetry and Me: Nadine Cranenburgh

Ripple Poetry

1.  What is your earliest memory of poetry?
The earliest poems I remember hearing were ‘Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace’ by AA Milne, and  The Swing, ‘Bed in Summer’ by Robert Louis Stevenson. I enjoyed imagining myself as a soldier in a beefeater hat and hearing words about playing in the park and going to bed in daylight as they were things I actually did! I must have been very young (under five) when my mum read them to me, and they were early influences when I began writing poetry for children.


2. When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?
When I had kids! At first I didn’t write anything down, I made verses up and recited them aloud to entertain and occupy my sons when they were babies and toddlers. Not surprisingly, the first poems I thought up were about them. When I was…

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Ten Things About Poetry and Me: Stephen Whiteside

Another in my series on Australian Children Poets.

Ripple Poetry

Stephen Whiteside

1.What is your earliest memory of poetry?

My father read me the poetry of Banjo Paterson when I was a young child. I loved the bouncy rhythms, the clever rhymes, the rollicking stories, the colourful characters, the rich settings. In short, I loved everything about it!

Banjo Paterson

2.When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?

I began writing poetry in a consistent way from the age of 21. However, it was not until I reached my mid 30s that I began to write for poetry for children. I think I needed that distance from my own childhood. It feels like a great privilege, but also a great responsibility, to write for children. Adult minds are largely formed, but the minds of children are still very fluid, and can be influenced for better or worse by a great range of stimuli.

3.Do you think writing…

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Freedom For Every Child

Magic Fish Dreaming

From the Perkins Family Archive

I wish for every child in the world, freedom from war, freedom from hunger, free education, and someone who cares for them and loves to read them poetry.

Thanks so much to the following people for their much valued and precious feedback on Magic Fish Dreaming.

Thank you to the Children’s Book Academy for their recent interview.

Thank you to the Sandcliffe Writers Festival for giving me a voice. And everyone who stopped to look at my book and those of other presenters on the table at the Bracken Ridge Library.

All the people who helped make this book delight in knowing how young readers are responding to the art and the stories and I do pass your messages on to Helene Magisson our illustrator as well.

It gives me hope!

I have begun work in earnest on a sequel to Magic Fish Dreaming.  …

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