Publishing Reimagined

(c) June Perkins

Extract from my Article,  “Publishing Reimagined – Discoveries of a Multiplatform Storyteller” Vol 1, Issue 8, pp 40-48

“Stories are important because they can inspire, challenge and transform the person creating or experiencing them: to do this for more than their creators they need to connect with an audience.

The journey to find an audience for even hard working and talented writers can be a long and arduous one, full of rejections, and a long wait before publication.

However, if one reimagines the publishing process and sees it as existing far beyond and prior to a printed page, and the big publishers in the world, the journey itself can be purposeful, educative and integral to the development of your creative abilities.  One can make one’s own luck!

In my personal journey as a writer looking for her audience I have avoided boxes of fitting into a single art form, genre, and working on a single platform, to make the following discoveries.

You can effectively publish through reading a poem in an open public reading: on radio, or in person and sometimes dramatizing it.

A poem need not be a static, a never changed creation, but can be one which an audience help shape.  It is especially fun to do this with reading to children or even anti-poetry fans, who are so honest in their responses!  If you can win them over in your reading you know the poem has done well in reaching a wider audience.  ”

TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE VISIT ENTHRALLED

A Long Way From Misery

Jacqui Halpin, Jack Turner, A Long Way from Misery, Book   Launch-1

Jacqui Halpin is an Australian children’s author whose stories have won prizes in writing competitions and been published in anthologies. She attributes her love of storytelling to her father, Jack Turner. ‘Listening to the amazing adventures Dad had growing up stirred my imagination and transported me back to his world,’ Jacqui says. Jacqui has co-written her father’s memoir, A LONG WAY FROM MISERY, which is a rollicking journey through the Australia of yesteryear with a true Aussie larrikin who grew up on a farm called Misery.

 Jacqui is passionate about preserving the social history of Australia for future generations and is currently writing a series of historical junior fiction novels inspired by her father’s adventures growing up.

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June: Can you give us a short synopsis of the book?

Jacqui: A Long Way from Misery takes you on a rollicking journey through the Australia of yesteryear with Jack Turner, the larrikin shearer, as he rescues his brother from being drowned by a kangaroo, rides a wild steer through the house, and leaps off a moving train. But these misadventures are nothing compared to his mother wielding a carving knife.

Born in 1926, Jack lived in a different time, but the way he sees it, they were better days. He loved his childhood growing up with his siblings and mates on a farm called Misery, and retells it with delight.

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June:  Tell us a bit more about your Dad.

Jacqui: Dad has entertained many friends, family, and acquaintances over his long life with the tales of his younger years. He is a quick-witted larrikin who loves to laugh and make others laugh.

He was born in Rylstone, New South Wales in 1926, and raised on a farm called Misery. He moved to Queensland in 1956 and lives in Brisbane with his wife of 53 years, his three children, five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

A former shearer with no education and a rough and ready upbringing, Jack’s ‘that’ll do me’ attitude has stayed with him throughout his long life and seen him through many a scrape. Hard-working, and with the ingenuity born from being raised in the bush, Jack has built and fixed everything from houses to toys.

He has had too many jobs to mention, met too many people to remember, and had too many adventures to record. He has lived an ordinary life full of extraordinary stories.

June: How long have you been working on Long Way from Misery?

Jacqui : It’s 12 years this month since my dad first gave me the audio tapes of the stories he could remember from his childhood and youth and I said I’d turn them into a book.

June: What was it like working with your Dad on writing the book?  Highlights? Challenges?  Any funny stories?

Jacqui:I don’t regret one minute that I’ve spent with Dad working on ‘the book’. I do regret that I has taken me this long, and now two of his brothers will never get to read it. If I knew back then what I know now it would have been published in half the time. One of the challenges was to put some sort of order to Dad’s stories.

He had a lot of stories (there wasn’t room for them all in the book) but he didn’t remember them in chronological order, if he had it would have made my job a hell of a lot easier.

We had so many laughs creating this book. I can’t remember what about exactly but just sitting round the kitchen table at Mum and Dad’s place laughing at what Dad was saying. Mum, too, has a great sense of humour. She has made countless cups of tea and lunches for me while we were working, and looked up the spelling of many obscure places that Dad shore at. And not with the aid of google, with a map and a magnifying glass.

One of the highlights while putting this book together was that Dad and I went to Rylstone and he guided me out to Misery Farm. It’s not called that now. Only the real old timers remember it as that. But dad found his way out there and I got to have a look around his old hut and take photos and get a better idea of how they lived. It’s falling down, which is a shame.

It was great to see Rylstone and walk with him on the streets that he walked as a child. And visit the pubs and the dance halls and the shearing sheds he had many an adventure in. I even got to meet some of his old mates too.

 June: What were your emotions on the launch day?  Where did you hold it and why?  What was the program?

Jacqui: Launch Day was a lot of work but well worth it. It was a celebration of all the hard work. A rejoicing for what we had accomplished. I could not have done it without the help of my family who were helping out all day.

My daughter, Emily, even had shirts made for the occasion. There was a great turn out of people. It was so uplifting to see so many friends and family there supporting us. Dad had a smile on his face all day.

It was held in Decker Park at Brighton because that’s where Dad and his family camped when they first moved up to Queensland. We had tea and damper and Hard Timer biscuits just like Dad’s mother made whenever visitors turned up at Misery. They were a hit. So many people asked for the recipe. I’ve now put the recipe on our blog.

Book Signing, Jacqui Halpin

 June: Why was it important for you to publish this book and set up your own press to do so?

Jacqui: I’d tried for several years to get a publisher, and although we had some interest, an agent read the first two chapters in 21/2 hours and asked for more, but no one would commit. Dad will be 90 this year. I couldn’t wait any longer. Besides, as Dad always says, ‘If you want something done, do it yourself.’ So that’s what we did.

 June: What role have writing buddies played in assisting you through the journey of writing, editing, and publication?

Jacqui: I have had a tremendous amount of help from my Write Link friends with this project. Their advice in self-publishing has been invaluable. Seeing the success of self-published authors like Karen Tyrrell, Charmaine Clancy and Nickolas and Alison Lochel, showed me that it was possible to do this self-publishing thing and do it well. I went through Book Cover Café and I could not have done it without them either. Anthony and his team were brilliant. I mean, you just have to look at the cover. I love the cover of our book! Anthony designed that.

A Long Way from Misery is available on Amazon or, for signed copies, through the authors at crownmountainpress@yahoo.com

For more information about Jacqui and her writing please visit her website:

jacquihalpin.com or follow her on Facebook www.facebook.com/jacquihalpinwriter

Jacqui Halpin, Jack Turner, A Long Way from Misery, Book   Signing-1

Congratulations Jacqui, and thanks so much for your visit to the blog!

 

Making More Time for Writing and Soul: Saturday Writing Sagas 7

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Do you ever feel you need more time to write or create, like you spend too much time doing administration in your writing/creative day?

I think often, as creatives, we wish we had assistance, agents, publicists so we simply had more time to be creative. But these things all cost and until we make enough as artists/writers when are we going to afford such help.

Perhaps by having an well paying part-time day job that still gives enough time to write/do art? Hmm any of my readers in that position?

I am facing this issue head on, and about to embark on making more time for creating my art and writing by seeing if I can find some suitable grants out there that will help me employ some people to assist in the other work of being an artist/writer – the admin.  I think I remember seeing some.

If you know of any grants please let me know, I’d appreciate your help. I’ll let you know how I get on in the saga that is called building a full time writing career.

On an up-lifting note, I have sent my first individual self published book of poetry and stories to my designer, Paulien Bats, with a proposed page sizing! Yes, she is working on it and soon it will be even closer to being a reality.  I’ve had some stories and photography accepted to an upcoming Anthology for a writing group in Queensland (more on that later).

If you are a writer you will know that buzz of having work selected by an editor for publication.  It is an absolute joy.

Until next Saturday happy writing and creating and may you find the butterfly soul of song!