Country Boys and Country Girls

Ripple Poetry

Image by June Perkins

A song lyric

Country boys and country girls
dream more than sugar cane.
Country boys and country girls
want more than endless rain.

They’re picking stars from skies above.
They’re catching pieces of the moonlight.
They’re running to the canopies
of light.

Country boys and country girls
often hide their pain
but they’re still holding
onto all their dreams
looking into the firelight
to find the global streams.

They’re picking stars from skies above
They’re catching pieces of the moonlight
They’re running to the canopies of light.

Country boys and country girls
often leave these towns
‘cause when the pickings done
there’s too few jobs around
and when a cyclone’s been
it’s even harder still
but now they’ve just got to
have a stronger will.

So they’re leaving behind the sugar cane
they’re saying goodbye
to endless rain
And they’re still looking
for the canopies of…

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Beyond Frames

A poem from Under One Sky

Ripple Poetry


Image by June Perkins

I am looking for the frames
to help me break the frames;
remembering Playschool windows
round, oval, and square.

I am remembering how my dolls
were broken hand-me-downs
and how I thought my frizzy hair
made me look a clown.

I was a little mother
to my brothers growing up
and wondered if they would
ever dare to break the frames.

I always wanted to have the
Straightest hair.
I never understood why.

Fighting back those tears of growing up
I’m still looking beyond the frames
living in the land of sugar cane.

I’m seeing all the kids running off to school
They’re so caught up trying to be cool
a little bit of facebook, a little bit of blackberry
but bullying’s the same
hasn’t much changed.

Everybody’s trying to be the same
no one really wants to break the frame.

But every now and then…

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Driving City and keeping a challenge small

trafficImage Credit: Greg Neate Creative Commons some rights reserved

Those of you who follow this blog regularly will know that I have been a bit wary of driving in Brisbane.  So much so that I just didn’t drive at all for our first few months here.

You will know that it took me many years to finally obtain my licence  and I have only had it for a few short years and that my PNG Mum has never obtained her license.

You may not know that I felt like all my ancestors were with me the day I got my license.  It was a big deal!  I was doing it for my Mum as much as myself.

I have loved having a license and being able to stretch my horizons with the freedom it brings.  I especially enjoyed shopping without all the family in tow!

I think part of the problem with me driving in the city is that I learnt to drive in the country.  I just wasn’t sure I could safely cut it on city roads.

A dear  blog reader did say,’ you are just making a bigger obstacle for yourself June, just do it,’ and so her voice was in my head a lot in a positive way, saying ‘ you can do it!’

So yesterday I took the plunge, and began to drive again.

We started by dusting off the driving cobwebs with a  Sunday afternoon, simple back street drive,  on flat roads, through a countrified surburb.  Some how I ended up driving past a prison,  a mental hospital, and a lot of large kangaroos.  I had no idea where we were going as we were just driving for the sake of driving.

I negotiated lane changing and merging on small roads, past lots of roundabouts.  I paid particular attention to being even more watchful on the road, and using my mirrors.  Lots of my country drives were highway single lane, straight into town.  Really simple!  It’s not that you are not paying attention to the road, it’s just that there is so much less that can go wrong.  Driving around town in the country was very simple as well.

I did okay for my first city drive, but then I didn’t do anything too complex, next time I will build on that.  It might be a slow adjusting process, but I think I will work the most on lane changing safely as I just haven’t had to do that much at all , and our suburb is super hilly so I have to do a lot of hill driving practice till it becomes second nature.

The best thing about Sunday was lifting the chip on my shoulder and hurling it off into the bush! I look forward to the day I feel confident to drive and navigate my new home, but am happy to have taken the first wheels in that direction.  Many more driving adventures to come, starting with the simple and building to the days of complexity, like some of the wet season driving in the North, now that was a challenge!

 

(c) June Perkins

 

Rain, I Write it, Live in it

flood 045
Rain – I write it, live in it, love it and sometimes fear it and want to escape.

Like it or not, it’s an inescapable part of North Queensland life.

Rain can flood, trap, enclose and invite pieces of writing from within.

Rain refreshes, reminds and reflects moods.

I taste the rain and all it touches when I walk through the rainforest.  I see the world in the drops that creep across a licuala leaf and plop onto my nose.

 ‘A little bit of rain’ plead some – knowing that in our area the rainy season can go on and on until you wish you could just take a boat, row out to beyond where there is no rain.

‘It’s not rainy season yet,’ my husband says, yet it whispers, some would say a little too loudly, to us that it is on the way.

Others long for the rain as it brings a green coat to our surroundings and helps the healing of the rain forest.  They know rain is a double edged sleet of weaponry that can both create and destroy.  They know that the builders who repair the houses, and the roads, post Yasi, race the rain.

I call on the metaphor of rain when I am missing bananas, friends, and need a day to spiritually centre.  I long for its damp cooling power that takes away the heat that burns.

tropical garden

Often before the rain it’s sticky beyond belief, making you just want to peel your skin off, if that were possible, but still your bones would feel the humidity.

I call on rain, when the world is dusty, dry and full of drought, but just enough – but you know – not too much or too little.  But rain is not an ingredient in life that I can control.  It is not part of a recipe where all weather mixes to please the people.

I banish rain, when it makes the paddocks a sea, and farmers come out to move cows and horses to higher ground, when it decides a crop will be drowned and swept into nothingness, and never make it to a supermarket shelf.  I wish it to the far ends of earth and wonder why it can’t make its way to a desert where it would be welcome.  Rain doesn’t have logic or a will like that.  I must be a fool to think it so.
floods

I banish rain, when it cuts off the roads, and means I can only facebook or telephone for sociability and wish I had gone to the supermarket and brought a few more supplies.

I banish rain, when it floods to the point where people are perched on the top of their houses, just wishing rain would flow away down the drains or helicopters would arrive to pick them up. This hasn’t happened to us yet, thankfully.

I banish rain, when it’s cut off the section of the road I want to drive down and I know I am not going to make it through the overflowing river, and must find a safe road to somewhere dry and restful until the rain passes its fury away.  This is why we now own a 4WD.

Rain – I observe it, remember it, live in it, and sometimes rejoice in it.  The rain can heal, green, and cause my heart to dance like Ginger and Fred in old black and white movies. I wish I could send the rain down south where the fires are.

When rain has been gone too long, and the world is parched and needs an elixir, and waterfalls are tiny trickles, then rain is welcome.  Rain is my friend.

I know then I am lucky to live in the land of rain.

Nature walkers
This post can also be found at ABC Open’s Like it Or Not, 500 Words.  

Head over there to read more about inspiring ways people have overcome obstacles.

Country Music – Calls to My Heart

After an intensive blog challenge writing month, I am doing more private writing.  Next month I will share fewer stories but more regular photographs.  However, I am going to be disciplined and just share one photograph each time.  Obviously I take more, but there is always one I particularly like at the end of the session – ‘the stand out photograph.’  Sometimes it’s because it says more than this is my son or family and speaks to something wider.

Today my assignment was to take photographs of my son in a country setting with his guitar case.  I like country albums with people sitting on their guitars, near the country, or by the side of the road, and really want a few photos like this for my folio.

Here’s the one I like the most from today’s efforts!

Country Music – Calls to My Heart

Country Music
Country Music, Calls to My Heart – June Perkins

Ah soon the  holidays will be here, and plenty more time to listen to and play music – whether it be country inspired, folk, blues – time to crank up the music and relax.

Will be good to have more sleep when the farmers have finished preparing their fields for next season and the bandicoots stop prowling – mind you there’s always the ear plugs if we get desperate.  How many pairs do we have again?