Responding to Art with the Written Word

QAGOMA, Australian Collection

I have made significant progress on a poetry project, writing poems for The Words and Pictures  project at QAGOMA.

Which is just as well as there are just four days left for my final selections and edits.

Some of the works  have  inspired more than one poem.  One even inspired four pieces.

I now have to select which ones will be the most interesting or evocative for the people visiting the gallery.  I might share some of the others that don’t go in, here on my blog.

It is not easy as I am quite happy with each version, but then I have a vision of how all the works fit together and want them to be spaced throughout the gallery which will help guide me to the right ones for the series.

Also one of my goals is to  give the poems and micro stories a broad appeal, such that people of many ages might enjoy reading them, including people familiar with my work on Magic Fish Dreaming.

So now my role is to curate the right balance of my own work, to show that I love writing for children, families, youth and adults.

I look forward to seeing how the public respond to the writing once it is up on the Gallery Walls.

I have a few butterflies of course, but it is quite exciting to share poems alongside art works, and have them interact with each other.

If you visit, feel free to leave a comment on my blog and QAGOMA instagram (will let you know some hashtags) as I would love to know what you think.

I’ll let you know the dates it is up soon.

All Works from the QAGOMA, Australian Art Collection

 

 

Skyping for World Literacy

Magic Fish Dreaming

Image courtesy Mel Irvine, children in Philippines Reading Magic Fish Dreaming

So excited that I will be skyped to Philippines in September, to read  poems to some of the children gathering there to celebrate World Literacy Day.

My dear friend Mel Irvine, supported the kickstarter creation of the book and purchased it to share with Philippine’s children has recently extended this invitation to me. I thank her very much for the opportunity to share poetry and my story live to an overseas audience.

I applaud all her wonderful efforts working to empower the children and young people through the arts and education and feel both blessed and privileged to know her.

Will let you know how it goes!

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Brilliant News

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photo by Heidi Den Ronden

I am so excited to announce I have been selected for a mentorship to work on one of my picture book manuscripts.

Thirteen talented writers have been selected as mentorship recipients under the ASA’s Emerging Writers’ and Illustrators’ Mentorship Program.

Congratulations to all other recipients. May we all have the best year ever!

“Applications were addressed on literary merit, with reference to their genres.

The twelve writers awarded Copyright Agency supported mentorships are:

Elizabeth Bryer (Literary non-fiction)
Steve Fraser (Fiction)
Denise Cummins (Fiction)
Dr June Perkins (Children’s)
Alison Quigley (Fiction)
Nadine Craneburgh (Young adult)
Scott Williamson (Young adult)
Claire Roberts (Poetry)
Siang Lu (Fiction)
Jake Goetz (Poetry)
Amber Moffat (Picture book/text only)
Frances Olive (Children’s)

The children’s writer awarded The Edel Wignell Mentorship is:

Marian McGuinness

The five highly commended applicants are:

Vanessa Fairbrother (Young adult)
Orsolya Parkanyi (Non-fiction)
Patrick Thwaites (Young adult)
Rowena Sierant (Fiction)
Melissa Manning (Fiction)

 

The feedback on my section was :

“The successful picture book manuscripts clearly stood out for their dynamic characters, innovative genre-bending concepts, and/or their lyrical use of language. “

To read more head to  ASA Mentorship Winners 2015-16

PiBoIdMo Day 28: Paula Yoo Explores Non-Fiction Biographies (plus a prize!)

So true about research inspired books – I really love this advice and am now just finding a few more ideas more in the non fiction genre. Thank you.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

PaulaYoo2 copyby Paula Yoo

It’s Day 28 of Tara Lazar’s annual Picture Book Idea Month (AKA PiBoIdMo)! Two more days and you’re done. Best of all, you will have 30 ideas to explore for your next picture book draft… and hopefully, one day, a published book!

For today’s blog, I will walk you through the general process of how I write my non-fiction picture book biographies. Here we go…

1. How do I come up with a non-fiction picture book idea? I do the following:

  • KEEP CURRENT: Read books. Pay attention to the news (social media, TV news, newspapers/magazines).
  • BRAINSTORM: Brainstorm about your own personal life: hobbies, favorite music/TV/books/etc. You never know what ideas might spark!
  • FRIENDS: You never know—a friend might mention something that could spark an idea. For example, I have had friends mention an article they read that would inspire me to jot down a picture book idea…

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PiBoIdMo Day 29: Arree Chung Gets an Idea OUT and Makes it Work

I love this idea, and have been going through a process of this with some of my picture ideas. Ah and I do think kids find cots kind of scary sometimes. My children much preferred their bed!

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

by Arree Chung

2015-01-14 08:38

Has this ever happened to you? You’re working on an idea. You’re excited about it. You share it with your agent or editor and then they tell you that it’s not working. Thud, thud, thud (that’s the sound of my head hitting against the wall).

Back to the drawing board. Well, not always. Developing an idea and refining it is really hard but sometimes you can make it work. This happened to me, on the book I’m currently working on. It’s titled OUT.

In this post, I’ll share a few tips on developing an idea and how to make an idea work when it’s not working.

START WITH THE FEELING
Stories come from many places but sometimes, I like to start with the feeling. OUT began as a story tilted BREAKOUT.

At the start, I knew I wanted to make an adventure story. As a kid, I…

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