Brilliant News

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photo by Heidi Den Ronden

I am so excited to announce I have been selected for a mentorship to work on one of my picture book manuscripts.

Thirteen talented writers have been selected as mentorship recipients under the ASA’s Emerging Writers’ and Illustrators’ Mentorship Program.

Congratulations to all other recipients. May we all have the best year ever!

“Applications were addressed on literary merit, with reference to their genres.

The twelve writers awarded Copyright Agency supported mentorships are:

Elizabeth Bryer (Literary non-fiction)
Steve Fraser (Fiction)
Denise Cummins (Fiction)
Dr June Perkins (Children’s)
Alison Quigley (Fiction)
Nadine Craneburgh (Young adult)
Scott Williamson (Young adult)
Claire Roberts (Poetry)
Siang Lu (Fiction)
Jake Goetz (Poetry)
Amber Moffat (Picture book/text only)
Frances Olive (Children’s)

The children’s writer awarded The Edel Wignell Mentorship is:

Marian McGuinness

The five highly commended applicants are:

Vanessa Fairbrother (Young adult)
Orsolya Parkanyi (Non-fiction)
Patrick Thwaites (Young adult)
Rowena Sierant (Fiction)
Melissa Manning (Fiction)

 

The feedback on my section was :

“The successful picture book manuscripts clearly stood out for their dynamic characters, innovative genre-bending concepts, and/or their lyrical use of language. “

To read more head to  ASA Mentorship Winners 2015-16

PiBoIdMo Day 28: Paula Yoo Explores Non-Fiction Biographies (plus a prize!)

So true about research inspired books – I really love this advice and am now just finding a few more ideas more in the non fiction genre. Thank you.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

PaulaYoo2 copyby Paula Yoo

It’s Day 28 of Tara Lazar’s annual Picture Book Idea Month (AKA PiBoIdMo)! Two more days and you’re done. Best of all, you will have 30 ideas to explore for your next picture book draft… and hopefully, one day, a published book!

For today’s blog, I will walk you through the general process of how I write my non-fiction picture book biographies. Here we go…

1. How do I come up with a non-fiction picture book idea? I do the following:

  • KEEP CURRENT: Read books. Pay attention to the news (social media, TV news, newspapers/magazines).
  • BRAINSTORM: Brainstorm about your own personal life: hobbies, favorite music/TV/books/etc. You never know what ideas might spark!
  • FRIENDS: You never know—a friend might mention something that could spark an idea. For example, I have had friends mention an article they read that would inspire me to jot down a picture book idea…

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PiBoIdMo Day 29: Arree Chung Gets an Idea OUT and Makes it Work

I love this idea, and have been going through a process of this with some of my picture ideas. Ah and I do think kids find cots kind of scary sometimes. My children much preferred their bed!

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

by Arree Chung

2015-01-14 08:38

Has this ever happened to you? You’re working on an idea. You’re excited about it. You share it with your agent or editor and then they tell you that it’s not working. Thud, thud, thud (that’s the sound of my head hitting against the wall).

Back to the drawing board. Well, not always. Developing an idea and refining it is really hard but sometimes you can make it work. This happened to me, on the book I’m currently working on. It’s titled OUT.

In this post, I’ll share a few tips on developing an idea and how to make an idea work when it’s not working.

START WITH THE FEELING
Stories come from many places but sometimes, I like to start with the feeling. OUT began as a story tilted BREAKOUT.

At the start, I knew I wanted to make an adventure story. As a kid, I…

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PiBoIdMo Day 11: Joe McGee Lives in a Child’s World (plus a prize!)

Hahaha! Give me that passport back to childhood now!

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

joe mcgeeby Joe McGee

Inspiration…that’s what we’re here to discuss, isn’t it?

To bandy around, to kick back and forth like a dented Campbell’s soup can on a weed-choked school blacktop. You know, the kind of blacktop where a hundred little sneakers will soon be racing around, attached to skinny ankles, attached to band-aide slathered kneecaps, attached to Star Wars t-shirt wearing torsos, attached to toothless grins on eager faces.

You there…yes, you. The adult standing over by the bleachers. Can you—there, that’s better. No shirts tucked in. Can we smear some dirt on your knees? Maybe leave a little cheese doodle smear on your cheek? Let’s put a few candy wrappers, a rock, and a marble or two in your pocket. Good, now we can talk. I mean, after all, we’re talking about writing for kids, right?

How can we write for kids if our adult selves get in the…

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PiBoIdMo Day 10: Janna Matthies Gets Tough (plus a prize!)

I absolutely love how you describe your approach to tough topics. Excellent advice. Thanks Janna.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

by Janna Matthies

As a guest blogger during this high-gear month of generating Pi Bo ideas, I’m honored to share in the charge to Inspire! My first word of inspiration is this:

My new picture book, TWO IS ENOUGH (adorably illustrated by Tuesday Mourning), releases today! YIPPEE!!

twoisenough

While this might seem like shameless self-promotion (let’s face it, it is), it is also a reminder that people who only a few years ago were not published can one day accomplish that goal. Furthermore, we published authors—after only 4 books or, I hear, even after 25—are still dreaming, churning out ideas, putting bad ones through the shredder, writing, revising, submitting and hoping for the next book. The dream is attainable, and the process is ongoing for us all. We’re in this together!

My second word of inspiration is where I’ll land for today’s post. And it’s good news in a world where…

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