Welcome

juneperkins
June Perkins (taken by Heidi Den Ronden)

Dr June Perkins is a lyrical, jubilant, compassionate and poetic writer of Indigenous Papua New Guinean and Australian background with extensive experience in conducting cultural and creative writing workshops within community settings and in tutoring and mentoring primary school, high school and tertiary writers.

She is moved to write by pressing social issues, such as the future of the planet, the need to eradicate extremes of wealth and poverty and prejudice, and the optimism of young people. Her PhD was on the subject of writing empowerment, and ever since finalising that in 2004, she has been applying her research into her everyday practices as a writer in and for community.

In 2016 June won an ASA writing mentorship for picture books and successfully crowd funded and published Magic Fish Dreaming, a poetry book for children and the young at heart. In 2017 she won several Royal Dragon Fly Awards for Magic Fish Dreaming. Her work has been published in a huge variety of spaces, including ABC Open. She is working hard towards more publication breakthroughs, with a novel and picture books in progress.

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Welcome to the blog.

I blog literary events, interviews with creatives, life in Queensland,  progress on my writing projects, and the writing process.

Looking forward to your comments.

Please respect all copyright for this work. If you want to make use of something you need my prior written permission. See COPYRIGHT HERE.

I may not be the relevant copyright holder in all cases (reblogs).

If printing anything for classroom use please keep a CAL record and credit it.

Please respect all copyright for this work. If you want to make use of something you need my prior written permission. See COPYRIGHT HERE.

I am a member of the following:

Profiles at   

Write Links 

Just Write For Kids

SCWIBI

Australian Children’s Poetry

Australian Society of Authors

Creative Kids Tales  

 

You can also find me at

Twitter   Facebook    Vimeo    Pinterest    Nineteen Months

Magic Fish Dreaming 

Scribble Leaves

Ripple Poetry

3818753707_9d0a93692e_m Scribble Leaves – June Perkins

What does the writing
on the leaves
mean?

Who put it there?
Insect,
human or Great Spirit?

3823174566_00752b4f6c Hugging Heritage – June Perkins

Wrap your arms
around
green life.

Wrap your arms
around
the source
of your breath.

Wrap yourself
into
the story
of the carving.

(c) June Perkins all rights reserved words and images

First posted on this blog in 2015

 

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Lullabies and cradle songs

Ripple Poetry

Writing a Lullaby

I am thinking about cradle songs and their origins.
I am thinking of their patterns and intent.
I am planning a poem about a refugee mother singing a lullaby.
That lullaby is full of love and hope.
That lullaby comforts them both.
I am imagining where she sings that song.
I am seeing her when she knows that hope is gone.
I am seeing her pick herself up and keep on dreaming on.
Will you join me and listen to her song?
Will you put yourself into her journey?
Will you welcome her to your shores?
Will you add your own verse?

(c) Image and words

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Henna for Well Being

I have noticed Henna  (also known as mehndi) a reddish brown dye made from leaves and used to colour the hair and decorate the body, on the hands of women in art depicting Hinduism and on women from India and always wondered how it was done.

Henna is traditionally used for special occasions like weddings and birthdays in India, the Middle East, Pakistan and Africa but also research says it was something that poor people loved to do as they didn’t own jewellery. and could use it to adorn their bodies.

Our special occasion was just celebrating friendship and having a relaxing morning.

A well traveled friend of the family who has been doing henna since she was eleven years old offered to teach me and some friends how to do it.

For some reason some of my friends thought they would have henna done for them, but were surprised and interested to learn they would be doing the henna on themselves.

She gave us each pre-prepared (but you can make it yourself) henna which came in a little pack, called a henna cone. Only one person in the group had done henna before.

You can buy henna kits in Indian supermarkets, where the henna is already in dispensers that remind one of icing bags, only much more colourful. Online henna kits can vary from $9 to $35 depending on what is in them (they may include henna cones, moisturising oil and patterns).

My friend’s kit was purchased in India on by her mum on her travels. She gave us some photocopy instructions which had descriptions of small movements you can do to create your henna designs. Essentially this means patterns are broken down into smaller movements that you can then build together to make a larger design.


These moves had names like wind humps,  fooffy, wibble leaves, ziggy zoggy, fishbone, buds, flowers, mummies, sprouts, flowers and paisley. Designs we could choose from were Celtic, African, Indian or our own variation of any of these.

I struggled a little at first with the henna cone, but some people used to icing cakes, or just naturally dexterous, had the hang of it straight away. My daughter was a natural arty wizz.

Eventually I did learn to work the henna cone, with some gentle instruction from my friends who had the hang of it more easily.  I didn’t try anything too complicated though as it took my so long just to be able to work the dispenser.

Whilst we were doing the henna we chatted about travel, henna, learning creative things, religion, our countries of birth,  (which included South Sudan and Austria). when some of us arrived in Australia and more.  My friend said she loved that when you are doing henna you can enjoy the company of others without having to speak their language.  She is doing her masters in English as a second language teaching and has done workshops for children ten and above on doing henna.

After we had put our design onto our hands and it had dried for a while, we put some lemon juice onto our design to keep it wet for longer.  This help fix the dye as well.

The dye was orange on our hands straight after, and the next day it darkened to be a light brown.

You can also obtain a henna that is white, which potentially shows better on darker skin, or you can use this henna on the palm of the hands. My friend said the dye turns out differently on different days and different shades of skin.  It can be unpredictable.

My friend kindly let us take our henna dye dispenser home and some people, like my daughter continued to work on her design until her whole hand back and front, from wrist, to fingers to centre of hand were done.  She just loved it. Another participant showed her sister how to do it, and she had a go as well.

She kindly did a little bit of additional henna on to our hands once everyone had done most of the work themselves.

This day was a great bonding exercise for all involved, and a great exercise in self care!  We just enjoyed getting to know everyone in the group  as much as doing the henna.

In this global world, it is lovely to learn about different ways we can connect people through creative practices.  We all gained respect for those amazing henna artists who are able to do these designs so quickly and so well.

 

June Perkins

 

 

The Poet at Play 3 – Working with Metaphors

Find out how I created this first draft

People still
fear
the Trojan horse

Somehow this horse
is a boat
or a truck
full of people crying

It can’t be real
it is just a tool
to make us open
borders

We won’t be fooled
We must protect our
citizens

Oh for a portal to freedom
a falling Berlin wall
and all the Humpty Dumptys
falling down,
down,
down

toppling
from the wall
they installed

Oh for a portal
to compassion
hidden somewhere
in that wall
that is going
up, up, up, up

When will you believe
what you see
is not just a trick
and when will we all
sing a welcome song?

(c) June Perkins

Ripple Poetry

Image by June Perkins

This week I have been playing with metaphors.  Metaphors give us a memorable comparison to understand something which seems inexpressible at a deep level.

Some metaphors  have been so used that there have become clichés; so as I write I have to approach them with care and ingenuity.   I have to strive for originality.  But also intertextuality and allusion are going to be helpful.

I have been working with the ideas of gates, doors and walls, of barriers, and openings, of welcomes and denials.

My journey with gates, doors and walls is triggered by all the news about refugees around the world not being allowed to cross borders, and being put inside prisons, and separated from their children.

Historically walls are set up to protect from invasion of enemies. They surround cities, castles and more. But all walls have a gate for those who can be…

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‘Paper Boats’ by June Perkins

Australian Children's Poetry

Paper boats conjure dreams

of petals soaked by

scents of the

ocean.

Traveling boats

float in shadows

people

who have a simple hope

for happy lands,

but white markers sink

in sandy earth

marking graves of people

who cannot resist new germs.

‘Once watched paper boats,’

paternal grandfather says

in Vietnamese

but nobody understands

No translators here.

So shadow puppets dance

for petals

falling from kumquat boughs.

(c) June Perkins

https://ripplepoetry.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/paperboat.jpg

Creative Commons Flickr Geson Ratnow

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